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Back from London

Feeling jet lagged after a great trip to London for the weekend. While riding business class on the way back, I finally finished up the last of three essays of Nietzsche’s “On the Genealogy of Morals.” It started slow but the last half was an excellent argument about how Christian morality has so embedded itself in the West that even being an “atheist” is in some way just another stage in a long ascetic tradition – in this case, denying oneself the possibility of God’s existence.

There was also a passage about the strong versus the weak that resonated with me because of its arguments about herd mentality and meetings. I have always felt that meeting culture – “touching base,” having “a quick chat,” spewing 30- and 60-minute calendar blocks that probably merit only 5 minutes of time at most, etc. – was one of the most regrettable aspects of the workplace in the U.S. It’s like the corporate equivalent of church. So imagine my delight at this segment:

“[I]t should not be overlooked: the strong are as naturally inclined to strive to be apart as the weak are to strive to be together, when the former unite, this takes place only with a view to an aggressive collective action and collective satisfaction of their will to power, with much resistance from the individual consciences; the latter, on the contrary, gather together with pleasure at this very gathering, – their instinct is just as satisfied in doing this as the instinct of the born ‘masters’ is basically irritated and unsettled by organization.”

Meetings and gatherings of any kind, especially ones that involve, say, at least 3 people, are usually a waste of time for individuals who do their best work on their own. Being a cynic, I have often thought that the purpose of most corporate meetings is exhaustion – bringing people together in an ‘all-hands’ environment in which attention spans are tested and things are agreed to when no one is paying full attention. Opinions of people who don’t feel comfortable in the superficial environment of meetings – the ‘best’ argument doesn’t always win and is overcome by the best-sounding argument – are also crowded out.

I will write more about the last part of “On the Genealogy of Morals” later since it is really a treasure-trove of useful contrarian arguments against 21st century attitudes toward work. For now, though, I’ll note that Nietzsche talks about how the appeal of religion and the act of congregation – which these days has shifted in the U.S. from churches to workplaces – is the product of poor physical well-being (which needs some kind of relief) and wanting to be someone else. I can agree with that.

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